length of lower control arms

Discussion in 'General Motoring' started by z, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. z

    z Guest

    Speaking of lower rear control arms for a 92 civic sedan, does anybody
    know which of the aftermarket replacements are stock length, and which
    are shorter for camber improvement with lowered suspension?
     
    z, Jan 8, 2007
    #1
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  2. z

    jim beam Guest

    you use adjustable upper arms, not lower. readily available. if you
    want the wheel track wider, use spacers on the hubs.
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #2
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  3. z

    jim beam Guest

    you use adjustable upper arms, not lower. readily available. if you
    want the wheel track wider, use spacers on the hubs.
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #3
  4. z

    Tegger Guest


    Which will quickly eat up the wheel bearings.
     
    Tegger, Jan 9, 2007
    #4
  5. z

    Tegger Guest


    Which will quickly eat up the wheel bearings.
     
    Tegger, Jan 9, 2007
    #5
  6. z

    jim beam Guest

    how is that?
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #6
  7. z

    jim beam Guest

    how is that?
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #7

  8. Just a wild guess but I imagine moving the weight to the outside of
    those bearing is going to play hell with them. The axle/bearing
    assembly is designed with the weight centered on the bearing surfaces.
    Move it in or out and you concentrate the weight (not to mention the
    forces inflicted on the wheel by uneven terrain) on the end of the axle.
    Bad ju ju!
     
    Unquestionably Confused, Jan 9, 2007
    #8

  9. Just a wild guess but I imagine moving the weight to the outside of
    those bearing is going to play hell with them. The axle/bearing
    assembly is designed with the weight centered on the bearing surfaces.
    Move it in or out and you concentrate the weight (not to mention the
    forces inflicted on the wheel by uneven terrain) on the end of the axle.
    Bad ju ju!
     
    Unquestionably Confused, Jan 9, 2007
    #9
  10. z

    jim beam Guest

    ok, but:
    1. the wheel is already offset from the center line of the bearing anyway.
    2. normal spacers aren't going to make a lot of difference - unusual to
    go much more than 10mm.
    3. it's all relative. the op is lowering and presumably "racing".
    bearings take a hit in this situation anyway. literally if the car is
    lowered too much and the car's riding on the bump stops.
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #10
  11. z

    jim beam Guest

    ok, but:
    1. the wheel is already offset from the center line of the bearing anyway.
    2. normal spacers aren't going to make a lot of difference - unusual to
    go much more than 10mm.
    3. it's all relative. the op is lowering and presumably "racing".
    bearings take a hit in this situation anyway. literally if the car is
    lowered too much and the car's riding on the bump stops.
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #11
  12. z

    Guest Guest

    I have heard the explanation, whether myth or fact, that the use of spacers
    will cause premature failure of bearings. Since the axle flange is always
    out
    past the centerplane of the bearing, like you, I dont think it matters too
    much.

    I tend to think this may be another garage legend, but wont stick my neck
    out on it.
     
    Guest, Jan 9, 2007
    #12
  13. z

    Guest Guest

    I have heard the explanation, whether myth or fact, that the use of spacers
    will cause premature failure of bearings. Since the axle flange is always
    out
    past the centerplane of the bearing, like you, I dont think it matters too
    much.

    I tend to think this may be another garage legend, but wont stick my neck
    out on it.
     
    Guest, Jan 9, 2007
    #13
  14. z

    anumber1 Guest

    A load that the bearing is designed to handle.
    10mm that is going to move the load out, changing the designed fulcrum
    of the original geometry, increasing the load on the bearing.
    The point of a well designed aftermarket control arms is to keep the
    suspension geometry correct in the areas that matter.

    Bearing load and various wheel alignment tracking angles would be very
    close to the original design.
     
    anumber1, Jan 9, 2007
    #14
  15. z

    anumber1 Guest

    A load that the bearing is designed to handle.
    10mm that is going to move the load out, changing the designed fulcrum
    of the original geometry, increasing the load on the bearing.
    The point of a well designed aftermarket control arms is to keep the
    suspension geometry correct in the areas that matter.

    Bearing load and various wheel alignment tracking angles would be very
    close to the original design.
     
    anumber1, Jan 9, 2007
    #15
  16. z

    jim beam Guest

    it might have been a "factor" in the old days of bad bearings and
    positive scrub radius, but now we have good bearings and negative scrub
    radius... having sealed bearing units that can't be "helped" by the
    racer kiddie adding more grease extends bearing life significantly too.
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #16
  17. z

    jim beam Guest

    it might have been a "factor" in the old days of bad bearings and
    positive scrub radius, but now we have good bearings and negative scrub
    radius... having sealed bearing units that can't be "helped" by the
    racer kiddie adding more grease extends bearing life significantly too.
     
    jim beam, Jan 9, 2007
    #17
  18. z

    jim Guest

    Well so is having fat aunt Martha sitting in the passenger seat, but it
    is not likely to affect the life of the bearing in any measurable way.

    -jim
     
    jim, Jan 9, 2007
    #18
  19. z

    jim Guest

    Well so is having fat aunt Martha sitting in the passenger seat, but it
    is not likely to affect the life of the bearing in any measurable way.

    -jim
     
    jim, Jan 9, 2007
    #19
  20. z

    jim beam Guest

    dude, with respect, you're going to get more transient bearing load on a
    bearing from having suspension lowered too far than you are from spacers.
    hardly - all it does is correct camber. it does nothing for the swing
    radius of any of the suspension components themselves.
    by what margin??? the vehicle has a working load in the range of
    800lbs. how do you think spee-dee ricer with his 10mm spacers and 90lb
    girlfriend is going to exert more leverage on the bearings than spec?
    install an even bigger sub?
     
    jim beam, Jan 10, 2007
    #20
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